Are You Prepared for an Earthquake, Hurricane or Natural Disaster?

earthquake disaster

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How to Prepare for Hurricanes and Earthquakes

 

This a great article…..after living in Mexico for 7 years and preparing for hurricanes year after year, cleaning up the mess they leave, volunteering, providing food, water, shelter and clothes to victims in devastated areas, I did learn the importance of being prepared. I am a California native, that has lived though too many earthquakes to count, but yet, I see people going crazy when these events occur. Why not take some precautions, hurricanes we can predict days in advance, earthquakes we can’t……These types of weather and earth changes have been going long before we had all the technology and will continue forever…..Don’t be surprised, be prepared…..Take 5 minutes and get a list of what you should do.

 

EARTHQUAKE EXIT STRATEGY
TOP TEN THINGS TO PACK

Exit strategy you might ask after an earthquake?  Why not just have 3 days, one week, or even a month of goods on hand and ride it out?  After all, the local, state and U.S. governments will step in and restore water and electricity, right?

MEGA-QUAKE & TSUNAMI THREAT: Scientists say the worst natural disaster in the history of the nation is coming. Let us know: Would you move?

Posted by Shepard Smith on Wednesday, July 15, 2015

 

Yes, IF it is just a localized event.  But if you live in one of the high earthquake probability zones such as the North American West Coast or the Mississippi Valley, there is the worst-case possibility of multiple earthquakes along fault lines that run for hundreds of miles, including a number still being discovered.  These fault lines travel through some of the most populated cities in the United States, Mexico, and Canada.  It’s one thing for say 50,000 or even 100,000 people to be without water and power for a few days.  But what if suddenly one million, three million, or even ten million people find themselves without food, water, and electricity for MONTHS?  Then you have the extreme probability of hundreds of thousands of people starving to death.  Think how dangerous that will be.  There is no way our governments and organizations like the Red Cross or Salvation Army can feed that many people even one meal a day.

So as people become more desperate you will see mobs searching for food and water—and of course valuables—in one sub-division after another.  It’s impossible to protect your family against that type of onslaught.  Your best bet is to leave the area IMMEDIATELY upon learning of widespread destruction.

And there’s another reason for leaving the area.  Have you seen the news reports of the dust kicked up in the air by earthquakes?  This is very toxic as you can imagine, and there will not be just one earthquake, but many aftershocks, some close to the original magnitude of the first one.  As an example, since September 4, 2010 when Christchurch, New Zealand had a 7.1 earthquake that destroyed quite a bit of their downtown area and killing a number of people, they have had over 10,000 aftershocks!  Once the West Coast begins to shake, I don’t think it will stop for many months or even years.

So what plans can you make to prepare for “the big one?

Plan your route of escape.  Try to take roads that have NO bridges, or ones with side streets that bypass the bridges and overpasses, as there’s a good chance they will have collapsed or be unsafe to drive over.

If your family members are in different locations when the earthquake strikes, you need to have a plan to pick up the children, or to meet your loved ones at a particular meeting point.

Keep your cars tuned and with good tires.  You may have to drive on the shoulders of roads with debris at times.

Try to continually refill your gas tank at the half-way point instead of waiting until it’s almost empty.  There will be no electricity to pump gas, so you’ll have to go with what’s in the gas tank.

Consider buying a satellite radio for each vehicle and an Emergency Kit for each one, if you have not already done so.

Buy earthquake insurance, if at all possible, from a national insurance company.  You might find it easier to be compensated, especially if you can spare five minutes to take photos of your dwelling and damage.

Have a portable disaster supply kit – It’s important to gather some things before a storm, because supplies may be gone after the storm hits. This to-go bag should be portable, and it should contain:

So here are the TOP 10 THINGS TO PACK in preparation for widespread earthquakes:

  1. WATER—1 GALLON PER DAY FOR 3 DAYS FOR EACH PERSON
  2. TENT: YOU’LL NEED ONE WHETHER YOU EVACUATE OR STAY
  3. PLASTIC TUBS TO HOLD EMERGENCY ITEMS
  4. DRY FOOD: 3 DAYS MINIMUM, PREFERABLY 7 OR MORE
  5. FLASHLIGHTS WITH EXTRA BATTERIES
  6. IMPORTANT PAPERS: Copies of Birth Certificates, Passports, Financial, Life &   House/Property Insurance & Contact Info, Auto Insurance Policies.
  7. TOILET PAPER: LARGE SUPPLY
  8. TOILET SUPPLIES: SOAP AND OTHER ARTICLES
  9. MEDICINES: Plus copies of prescriptions, ID photos & Emergency med info
  10. PET FOOD & SUPPLIES: At least 2 weeks minimum

Have a plan

Know if your home is vulnerable to storm surges, flooding and wind.
Have a safe room/area. The safest area may not be in your home, but may be a shelter in your community.
Know the route away from danger. Some communities have hurricane evacuation zones. Have a primary and alternative route.
Plan places where your family can meet in and out of your neighborhood
Have an emergency contact who everyone in your family knows and can contact.
Secure your home. Forget about taping your windows (This will not stop any objects hurled through the air by 90 mph winds). Have plywood custom-cut to fit your windows and pre-drill holes in the plywood for screws. Custom shutters can also be made ahead of time. Also, remove all dead or loose limbs from trees and shrubs on your property.

How To Prepare: List of Websites

Oregon – Cascadia  Pacific Northwest Plug in your address to see how your community would fare after a magnitude 9.0 ‪#‎UnpreparedNW‬ http://www.opb.org/aftershock/

Check You Address and State for possibility of earthquake:  http://www.homefacts.com/earthquakes

Stay informed

CNN Hurricane tracker (http://www.cnn.com/hurricane)

Local television and radio stations

National Hurricane Center: Website / mobile site / Twitter

Your local National Weather Service forecast office

FEMA: Website / Twitter

The American Red Cross Online Disaster Newsroom

Ready America

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